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tTt)c Senior (Class of '21 ttas puulisljcb ttjis 
Annual, tljc fiftl) uolumc of Cfjc 3lacrjuan, for a 
tlueefolb purpose: 

Jfirst, the (Class liopcs bp this rcrorb of school 
life to prescrue in tlic memorp of the stubents of 
the iP>aiuesuillc feigh s?rhool the happp associa- 
tions anb main' things acljieueb. 

^rtonb, rue hope tJjat tficsc pages toil! art as 
an incentiue to tt)c classes in pears to come anb 
seruc as a means of bcucloping cooperation among 
the stubents. 

ILasllp, toe offer this Annual especiallp to our 
fcllouj classmates as a memento of their Senior 
pear. 






PACK I 



Bebicatton 

Co ffltss itlarp (HHoobbcrp, tofjose 
untiring interest anb sympathetic aib 
fjaUe mabe it possible for tfje Senior 
Class of '21 to accomplish tofjat it Ijas, 
toe respcctfttllp bebicate tljis, tfje ftftf) 
bolumc of Cfje Sllacljuan. 



PAGE 5 






BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

W. R. Thomas W. R. McKinstry 

Chairman Secretary 

G. W. Welch 



BOARD OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

B. R. Colson E. R. Simmons 

Chairman Secretary and Superintendent 

W. H. Powell S. J. Ellis 



PAGE 6 










Prof. F. W. Buchholz 
Principal 



PAGE 







PAGE 8 



FACULTY 

Prof. F. W. Buchholz, A. B.... Principal of Gainesville Schools 

J. Rex Farrior, A. B. Asst. Prin.; Coach; Latin and Mathematics 

Miss Mary Woodbery, A. M English and French 

Miss Marguerite Furgerson, A. B English and Spanish 

Mrs. J. M. Leake, A. B ....English and Mathematics 

Mrs. A. W. Cawthon, L. I Mathematics 

Mrs. H. A. Hall, B. S.~~ -.- Science 

Mrs. W. P. Coffey History 

E. A. Clayton. Latin, History and Mathematics 



PAGE 9 



ALACHUAN STAFF 

John A. H. Murphree.. Editor-in-Chief 

Thelma Cardy _ Associate Editor 

Cora Mae Hunter Literary Editor 

Helen Smith Art Editor 

Rena Murrill _ Society Editor 

Daisy Kellum Joke Editor 

Eula Zetrouer Poet 

Wilma Watson Historian 

Effie Doran Senior Statistician 

Louise Beall Business Manager 

John Crandall Subscription Manager 



PAGE 10 













PAGE 11 







U. S. POST OFFICE AND LAND OFFICE 




UNIVERSITY AVENUE LOOKING WEST 



PAGE 12 









T <=» THE 








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PAGE 13 




OFFICERS 



John M. Crandall 
Helen A. Smith... .. 
Cora Mae Hunter .. 



President 

Vice-President 

.Secretary and Treasurer 



CLASS COLORS 

White and Gold 



MOTTO 
Quality, not Quantity" 



MASCOT 

Babv Cawthon 



CLASS FLOWER 

Shasta Daisy 



PAGE 14 










John M. Crandall 

"Everybody's wrong but thee and me, 
and sometimes I think thou art a little 
wrong-." 

Member of Comet Staff '20; Circula- 
tion Manager of Annual '21 ; President 
Class '21; Director of Hula Hula Show, 
Carnival '21; Track Team '21; Manager 
Baseball Team '21. 




PAGE 15 




Helen A. Smith 

". . . I'll be an artist, and I'll do things.' 

President Sophomore Class '19; Joke 
Editor Comet '20; Literary Editor Comet 
'21; Art Editor Annual '21; Vice-Presi- 
dent Class '21. 



Cora Mae Hunter 

"Talked of noble aims and high, 
Hinted of a future fine." 

Vice-President Junior Class '20; Class 
Reporter Comet '21; Literary Editor 
Annual '21; Secretary-Treasurer Class 
'21. 





PAGE 1G 





John A. H. Murphree 

"Believing in himself because he was 
believed in." 

Vice-President Sophomore Class; Ath- 
letic Editor Comet '20; Football '20; 
Captain Baseball Team '21; Secretary- 
Treasurer Class '20; Editor-in-Chief 
Comet '21; Editor-in-Chief Annual '21. 



Louise Beall 

"She never moved a finger to attract 
anyone; but, like Ninon de L'Enclos, all 
were attracted to her." 

Advertising Manager Comet '21 ; Ad- 
vertising Manager Annual '21; Vice- 
President H. A. H. Club, Dublin, Ga., 
'20; Manager of Tea Room, Carnival '21. 




PAGE 17 




Effie Doran 

"Beautiful, after the beauty of a 
woman who has done no wrong." 

Secretary-Treasurer Sophomore Class 
'20; Exchange Editor Comet '21; Mem- 
ber of Junior Baseball Team '20; Mem- 
ber "K. K. Klub;" Senior Statistician of 
Annual '21. 



Ren a Murrill 

"Great is thy prudence." 

Manager Junior Baseball Team '20; 
Captain Senior Basketball Team '21; 
Member of Spanish Club; Society Editor 
Annual '21. 





PAGE 18 




Thelma Cardy 

"Always faithful in the little affairs 
of her school days, she is ready for the 
large affairs of life." 

Secretary Freshman Class, Tarpon 
Springs, Fla.; Senior Basketball '21; 
President "K. K. Klub;" Assistant Ed- 
itor of Annual. 



Talmage Vansickel 

"He seemed to be going through life 
. . . 'much pleased' at everything." 

Captain Football Team '20; Member 
of All-State Football Team '20; Pitcher 
Baseball Team '18, '19, '20, '21; Mem- 
ber Track Team '21; Member "G" Club. 





PAGE 19 











Beulah Soper 

"Good nature and good sense are ever 
joined." 

President of Freshman Class '18, 
Winter Haven, Fla.; Senior Basketball 
Team '21; Manager of Freak Booth Car- 
nival '21. 



Daisy Kellum 

"Thou art clever, my daughter, and 
of a vast experience." 

Senior Basketball Team '21; Joke Ed- 
itor Annual '21. 





PAGE 20 











Beulah Strunk 

"The maiden to whom her work was 
all in all." 

Junior Baseball Team '20; Senior 
Basketball Team '21; Exchange Editor 
Comet '20. 



Guy Matthews 

"Thou art clever, my son, and of a 
ready tongue." 

Basketball Team '21; Senior Class 
Track Team '21; Manager Country 
Store, Carnival '21. 





PAGE 21 




Wilma Watson 

"Her face was a looking glass, and 
her forehead an open book, by reason 
of her innocence." 

Baseball Team '20; Member "K. K. 
Klub;" Manager Animal Show, Carnival 
'21: Class Historian '21. 



Ferrell Wolfe 

". . . And did much good work, and 
was honored by all who knew him." 

Basketball Team '21; Manager Ice 
Cream Booth, Carnival '21. 





PAGE 22 














Christine Tomkies 

"She was indifferent to praise or 
blame, as befitted the greatest." 

Junior Baseball Team '20 ; Senior Bas- 
ketball '21; Vice-President "K. K. Klub." 



Mary Crown 

"The curious, and even startling sim- 
plicity of her life is worth mentioning." 

Senior Basketball Team '21; Manager 
Fortune-Telling- Booth, Carnival '21. 





PAGE 23 





Eleanor Barton 

"Her chief virtue, an unmitigated 
patience." 

Manager Candy Booth, Carnival '21. 



Eula Zetrouer 

"A brilliant scholar who finds comfort 
and pleasure in her books." 

President Classes '18 and '20, Mica- 
nopy, Fla.; Class Poet '21. 












Ewing Anderson 

"But I've got my work to do and I 
must do it." 

Circulation Manager of Comet '21; 
Assistant Business Manager Annual '21; 
Member Senior Track Team. 



Mary Louise Crosby 

"And she was a damsel of delicate 
mold, with hair like the sunshine and 
heart of gold." 

"Our Prima Donna." 





PAGE 25 




Rutledge Emerson 

"A clever, steady lad, who might cut 
his way into the world if it were made 
of cheese." 

Football Team 19 and '20; Joke Ed- 
itor of Comet '21 ; Manager of "Devil's 
Dungeon," Carnival '21. 



Catherine Tilford 

"What is the spell that you manage 
so well?" 

Manager Flower and Baby Booth, 
Carnival '21. 





PAGE 26 







Gladys Brown 

"We grant, altho she had much wit 
She was very shy of using it." 

Manager Flower Booth, Carnival '21. 



James N. Anderson 

"I will be a child no more." 

Manager "Kill Kat" Booth, Carnival 
'21. 





PAGE 27 



CLASS HISTORY 

In 1917, we, the class of '21, made our brilliant advent into the halls of Gainesville 
High. Since then we have done nothing but add renown to the school. We have not 
always harmonized, but on the whole we have agreed remarkably well in thought and 
action. This is because we are neither very good nor very bad, but all are clever, a 
statement which no more than nine out of ten will contradict. 

During the year 1918 we lost our confused and timid (?) looks and stepped into 
the full glory of Sophdom. Yet we were spared from the proverbial weakness of 
Sophomore year and did not think that we were smart. 

During our Junior year we reached the zenith of our popularity. It was the 
Juniors of '19 and '20 who originated the idea of baseball among the girls. But only 
the Seniors of 1920 could we get to play against us. The result took away what cour- 
age was left in the others, and we possessed the field. We endured much criticism 
from failure to give the annual "Prom," but "circumstances over which we had nc 
control, etc.," prevented. Most amusing were the epithets with which we were char- 
acterized; but these things were so various that it was in vain we sought enlightenment 
concerning ourselves. 

Now we are Seniors. Our number, which was fifty-one when we entered our high 
school career, by both addition and subtraction, is now twenty-five. However strange 
it may seem we do not think we know everything in this world. We wear our superior 
air as a bluff for the lower classes. Yet we are a very talented bunch. Refer to the 
cartoons and poems in this annual for proof. Is there not an Emerson in our midst? 
Some are skillful in the manipulation of musical instruments, such as ukuleles and 
pianos. Is not the pianist in chapel a Senior? We have some in our midst who, by 
the power and beauty of the voice, will rise above our eminent singing leader, Mr. 
Teeters. Neither last nor least are the professionals in the art of bluffing, a prevalent 
class among us. Even in football do we succeed. Beside the greatest number of 
"best" players, the two "stars" hail from the Senior class. Seven of the Comet Staff 
have been chosen from our midst. 

And now we have come to a parting of the ways. For four long years we have 
toiled together in the class rooms, forming lasting friendships with fellow students 
and teachers which will retain a lasting place in our memories. As the day which 
we have been anticipating for four long years draws nearer and nearer, it is with 
mingled regret and gladness we think of the new era in our lives — regret for the 
past and anticipation for the future. Some will face life at once; others will complete 
their education with a college course. But whatever course they pursue the members 
of the class of '21 will always live up to the well-earned reputation of perseverance 
and studiousness they have won as students in Gainesville High. 



PAGE 



CALL TO THE CLASS OF TWENTY-ONE 

Before us like a dream, 

Oh, class of twenty-one, 
Lies life so full of promise. 

Beckoning us one by one. 

With a clarion call shrill and clear 

It calls us to the fight 
Where the powers of ignorance and darkness 

Are arrayed against the light. 

But thou, dear Alma Mater, 

Hath prepared us for our parts, 

And deeply hath imbedded 
Thy seal within our hearts. 

And as we play the "great game" 
We'll cherish thy name to the last, 

And strive in our fight for fame 
To hold thy ideals fast. 



ODE TO THE CLASS OF TWENTY-ONE 

Come, ye aiding muses, come inspire me, 

And give to me this art which I implore, 

To praise in song this class which I adore, 

To clothe in rhyme their virtues and their powers. 

0, tell, did ever see a class like ours? 

With thee, Muses, bring thy jeweled treasures 

For they have fitly won thy greatest pleasures ; 

Let's deck them with the laurels they have won, 

All this we do ere setting of the sun. 



PAGE 29 



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SENIOR CARNIVAL 

For the past several years it has been customary for each graduating 
class to present a play, but, disregarding this practice, the class of '21 
decided to do what has never before been done in the history of the G. 
H. S., to put on a carnival. Soon after this decision certain assignments 
were given to the different members of the class, whose duty it was to 
develop their special features. 

After much planning and working, the day of May 6th dawned clear 
and calm. No fitter day could have been made. The morning was spent 
by Seniors and a few assistants in decorating and other last-minute prep- 
arations. 

The Carnival began at 2 o'clock with a large parade. It was led by 
the Boy Scouts, followed by the U. of F. Band. Near the head of the 
procession were Prof. Buchholz, by proxy, on mule-back, and an imper- 
sonated Miss Shannon sedately riding in a cart driven by Mr. Farrior's 
double. They were followed by about twenty-five cars decorated in Purple 
and White or bearing signs advertising the various attractions. 

The next feature of the day was a baseball game in which the Business 
Men defeated the G. H. S. boys by a score of 15 to 9. 

Immediately following the game a "red bug" race was held. There 
were three entries, one car driven by Barton Douglass, another by Marion 
O'Kelley and the third by Emery Fowler. The Fowler machine proved to 
be the fastest and easily won the race. The prize was a ticket to all of 
the shows. 

At four o'clock all booths were opened to the public. At the right of 
the gate was the Devil's Dungeon, planned after a Trip to Mars, and 
promising a scary time for all who cared to enter it. Further down the 
line the Hula Hula Dancers and various attractions of the High Class 
Vaudeville appeared to entice the pleasure seeker into their show. The 
Tea Room, with its attractive Japanese waitresses, served appetizing 
lunches. Next to this was the beautiful Flower Booth and Baby Show, 
where many different kinds of flowers were sold and where each one was 
given the privilege of voting for his favorite baby. At the end of the 
Midway was the Snake Charmer's tent. Then along the other side were 
the "Wonders of the World," the Freak Booth, with its Human Encyclo- 
pedia, the Fortune Telling Tent, the Animal Show, containing many wild 
and ferocious ( ?) animals, the Country Store, "Kill the Kats" Stand and 
the Ice Cream and "Hot Dog" Booths. Everything was closed at nine-thirty 
for the Minstrel Show, the crowning feature of the day. 

The day was a success not only as one of good wholesome fun but from 
a financial standpoint as well. With the proceeds of six hundred dollars 
it exceeded all expectations. — E. D. 



PAGE 31 




PAGE 32 
















PAGE 33 







PAGE 3-1 



JUNIOR CLASS 

OFFICERS 

Cornelia Colson President 

Frank Brumley Vice-President 

Lena Chancey ._ Secretary and Treasurer 

Class Colors — Green and White. 

Class Flower — White Rose. 

Class Motto — "He who hesitates is lost." 



Elizabeth Baker 

Grace Ballentine 

Mary Linney Boothby 
Lucille Boring 

Lena Chancey 

Cornelia Colson 

Cleone Cooper 

Margaret Crown 

Hazel Cubberley 

Irene Colson 
Gladys Kelley Irene Denham 

Lillie Landers Dorothy Edwards 

Margaret Layton Mabel Edwards 

Ethel Merritt Mary Lee Fowler 

Jocie Maddrey Viola Graves 

Ida McDonald Ora Hiatt 

Janice Parham Florede Harris 

Zora Prevatt Wilda Holland 

Aubrey Thompson Sara Jenkins 

Blanche Wells 
D. S. Fagan Frank Babers 

John Gable Leon Baxley 

J. W. Hayes Barco Bishop 

Leland Hiatt Jennings Bobbitt 

Garland Hiatt Frank Brumley 

Bart Holly Frank Crom 

Birkett Jordan William Cockrell 

Earnest Lamons Heyward Davis 

John McNair William Edelstein 

Jack McDowell 

Max Pepper 

Gordan Philpot 

Cecil Robinson 

John Simpson 

Deveaux Vrooman 

Philip Vrooman 

Finley Williamson 

Carlos Zetrouer 



PAGE 35 




PAGE 36 










PAGE 37 




PAGE 38 



* 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

OFFICERS 

Agnes McCormick , President 

Lillian Long Vice-President 

Cecil Gracy Secretary and Treasurer 

Class Colors — Purple and Gold. 
Flower — Sweet Pea. 

Motto — "Let us keep inflexible and fortune will at last bend in our 
favor." 

Agnes Barton 

Annie Barton 

Inez Brooks 

Ila Mae Bryant 
Mary Baker 

Thelma Boltin 

Louise Bowers 

Eleanor Bryant 

Estelle Cheves 

Audrey Cobb 

Eddie Sue Colson 
Esther Jordan Catherine Davis 

Mary Kincaid Florence Dial 

Bernice Long Louise Darby 

Lillian Long Elizabeth Gable 

Hoi-tense Marable Annie Mae Gunn 

Lucy McArthur Mary Hampton 

Margaret McCleod Martha Harrold 

Agnes McCormick Lorene Hazen 

Mary Parker McCraw Julia Holly 

Miriam McKinstry Lillian Jones 

Mary McMillan 
Claire Noble 

Rhea Ni lder 
George Bates Mabel Perry 

Howard Bishop Ruth Riddick 

Witzell Black Margaret Seay 

Willie Blitch Katherine Tucker 

Donald Bishop Faye Turner 

Joe Cawthon Elizabeth Watts 

Leuber Colson Alice Willoughby 

Wiley Fuller 

Cecil Gracy 

Allen Haile 

William Le Grave 
W. P. Mosley 

Marion O'Kelley 
Joe Perry 

Ben Ridenour 

Jennings Rogers 
W. R. Soper 

Arthur Stringfellow 
Bill Truby 

Jim Turbeville 

Gardiner Welch 

Andrew Zetrouer 



PAGE 39 













PAGE 41 






FRESHMAN CLASS 


OFFICERS 


Noyes Long President 


Dorothy McClamroch Vice-President 


George Smith .....Secretary and Treasurer 


Class Colors: Black and Gold. 


Flower : Green Rose. 


Motto: "We climb." 


Clara Brennan 


Alberta Brigham 


Dorothy Bullaril 


Ruby Cellon 


Dempsey Creary 


Helen Cubberly 


Emily Dorsey 


Marian Everett 


Edith Everett 


Molly Greenberg 


Ruth Livingston Lee Harris 


Dorothy Lyle Fiances Heckard 


Mary MeCormick Iva Hines 


Dorothy McClamroch Thelma Keitel 


Averill McMillan Flossie Kite 


Edith McMillan Louise Kincaid 


Reba McMillan Maggie Kinsey 


Ellen Pepper Dorothy Lartigue 


Verna Pickett 


Myrtle Peeler- 


Lena Stephens 


Joe Bartley Mary Shaw 


Niles Bashaw Laura Strunk 


Wilcox Bostwick Laura Thompson 


Bob Black Ethel Tucker 


Hilly Burke Martha Thomas 


Paul Brinson Julia Tomkies 


Bronnie Bryant Katherine Voyle 


Mondell Cellon Roslin Williamson 


Clarence Crown Sabina Worthington 


Charles Dell 


Webster Merritt Maurice Edwards 


Nathaniel O'Kelley Francis Emerson 


W. D. O'Quin Marcus Edelstein 


Willis Pepper Loren Green 


Marvin Phifer Bill Hampton 


Gilbert Ramsey Lynn Holinrake 


Ralph Rhudy William Jackson 


Glenn Rivers Jim McClamroch 


Albert Swartz 


Ed Swearingen 


Calvin Seay 


Earl Simpson 


George Smith 


Cecil Thompson 


Charles Tucker 


Huber Watson 


Joe Waugh 



PAGE 43 







ALACHUA 

Years ago when Florida was still a territory the county of Alachua was formed. 
It was much larger than it is now and the conditions were very different. Then the 
Indians roamed the forest, hunted deer and turkey and fished the streams. They, 
however, were gradually driven from their native land by the more progressive, more 
powerful, more aggressive white race. When the white man became master of the 
land the Indians sought refuge in the Everglades. But the Red Man left his con- 
querors many things to remember him by, not only the numerous Indian mounds in 
which one may find tomahawks, arrowheads, implements of stone and the like, but 
also many, many Indian names which we use every day. 

Alachua is an Indian word meaning "big jug." The Indians gave this name to 
a large sink near Gainesville, which is really shaped like a large bottomless jug turned 
upside down. This sink borders on Payne's Prairie, a large tract of land, which when 
dry serves as a pasture for thousands of cattle. When the sink becomes stopped up, 
the prairie fills up and forms a large lake. From 1840 to 1880 it had been dry three 
separate times and each time it refilled. Between 1880 and 1892 a steamboat sailed 
on it, making regular trips between Micanopy and the landing near Gainesville. 
Since 1892 it has sometimes been dry and sometimes full. No one knows where all 
the water goes which drains into the sink from the prairie. Nor has anyone been 
able to unstop the "big jug," and keep the prairie dry. No wonder the Indians, in 
their superstitious minds, thought of it as a big jug. 

And so when our school came to choose a name for the Annual, "The Alachuan" 
was thought the most appropriate, not only because Gainesville is the chief school in 
Alachua county and has students from all parts of the county, but also because the 
name itself is musical and has local significance. — J. R. E. 



PAGE 44 













PAGE 45 



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PAGE 46 






G. H. S... 








G. H. S... 


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1920 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

Oct. 8 Gainesville Chalmers M. A. 

Oct. 23 Tampa Hillsboro H. S... 

Oct. 30 - Gainesville...... Florida M. A 

Nov. 5 Lake City Lake City H. S... 

Nov. 11 Gainesville .....St. Petersburg H. S. 

Nov. 20 Jacksonville Duval H. S — 

Nov. 25 Gainesville Plant City H. S 7 G. H. S 6 

Football at Gainesville High School still remains the King of all sports. This 
has been proven in more than one instance by the backing given Purple elevens by the 
high school students and townspeople as well. This faithful support is the reason 
why football plays the leading role in athletic events at G. H. S. To the people of 
Gainesville we extend thanks for their loyal support; may there be many more teams 
at Gainesville High as worthy of their patronage. 

This year's eleven was built about the nucleus of five men from the Champion- 
ship team of '19, the remainder of the squad being composed of players inexperienced 
save for that knowledge gained from a previous year on the "Scrubs." The material 
was light, averaging scarcely 137 pounds to the man, rather fast, and having all the 
fighting traits of a representative of the Purple and White. 

Coach Farrior, the new athletic director, took upon himself the duties of training 
the 1921 squad. The bunch appeared ragged in early practices, but from the first 
game, the team played with real style, amazing all by its exceptional ability. 

The opening game was with Chalmer's Military Academy, the much-heralded 
pigskinners from up state. Playing on home grounds the G. H. S. battled the Cadets 
to a standstill and but for hard luck at several stages of the game would have scored. 
The game ended to 0. 

Then came the game with Hillsboro High in Tampa. With reports coming from 
the Cigar City of one of the best aggregations in the history of that school, the Purple 
warriors invaded the Red and White territory none too confident, but nevertheless 
determined to fight. As all know G. H. S. prevailed by the score of 6 to 0, after a 
spectacular fray. In the last five minutes Captain Vansickel uncorked a dazzling 30- 
yard dash and two plays later crashed through the line for our only score. 

Games with F. M. A., Lake City and St. Petersburg High followed, all of which 
resulted in triumphs for G. H. S. by the scores of 20 to 0, 14 to and 7 to 0, respec- 
tively. The Petersburg game was one of the most interesting of the entire season, 
being won in the last moments of play after three long periods of gruelling action. 

With a record of five straight victories without being scored upon the Purple 
brigade journeyed to Jacksonville with a slight ray of hope of copping the game from 
the Duval Tigers, much praised and lauded for their previous work in the 1920 cam- 
paign. Sorely afflicted with stage fright or some other serious malady, the G. H. S. 
eleven crumbled before the rushes of the weighty Tigers. The D. H. S. team seized 
the large end of the 70 to score. While this sum does not represent the actual dif- 
ference in the two teams Duval High must be given credit for one of the best machines 
in the High School football history of Florida. 

The closing struggle was in Gainesville with our old-time rivals — Plant City. 
G. H. S. displayed a wonderful "come back" after the crushing Duval defeat and sur- 
rendered to the Planters by the margin of one point only after literally playing them 
off their feet for the first three quarters. t a tr ivr 



PAGE 47 




Lillian Jones 
Guard 

Lena Chancey 
Forward 

Dempsey Creary 
Guard 



Edna Earle Chesnut 
Coach 



Iary Baker 
Forward 



Catherine Davis 
Guard 



Ellen Pepper 

Jumping Center 



Dorothy Bullard Ethel Tucker 

Captain, Running Center Forward 



'AGE 48 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL 

Although G. H. S. has always been exceptionally well represented on the Girls' 
basketball court, this is the first year that the Purple Sextette has attained the high 
honor of State Champions. After defeating all comers in ten straight victories and 
accepting a challenge from the South Florida Champs and overpowering them, the 
Gainesville team was heralded as the best in Florida. 

The splendid showing of the Gainesville Six was the marvel of the entire state, 
for it seemed as if no team could check the onslaught of the Purple contenders. Be- 
ginning with the first game the team displayed rare form, defeating Alachua 64 to 20. 
Throughout the entire season the girls fulfilled all predictions made for them in the 
earlier contests. Enthusiasm was at its height when Stetson University met defeat 
at the hands of the Purple and White, 23 to 19. A victory over Ocala intervened and 
then that memorable struggle with Duval on a strange floor in Jacksonville. Again 
Gainesville did the stunt and won by the close margin of two points. A pair of vic- 
tories and then Duval was faced again ; this time, however, on the home court. In 
a brilliant game G. H. S. completely shattered all remaining hopes of the Red and 
White by seizing the big end of a 26 to 8 count. A victory over Orlando was followed 
by the contest with Bradentown, South Florida Champions. This battle for the de- 
cision of the State title was staged in Tampa. After a spectacular game the score 
stood 26 to 8 and Bradentown runner up in the Championship race. 

Miss Edna Earle Chesnut, who for the past two years has coached the G. H. S. 
girls, was the guiding force behind this year's Championship Six. The success of 
the team is in a great part due to her ability both as a player and as a coach. Too 
much praise cannot be given Miss Chesnut for placing Gainesville High first in bas- 
ketball. —J. A. H. M. 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 



PLACE DATE 

Gainesville Dec. 

Gainesville Jan. 

Melrose ..Jan. 

Gainesville Jan. 

Gainesville Jan. 

Duval Feb. 

Gainesville Feb. 

Ocala Feb. 

Gainesville Feb. 

Orlando Mar 

Tampa Apr. 



NAME 



OPPONENT 



16 Alachua H. S 

8 Orlando H. S 

13 Melrose H. S 

22 Stetson University 19 

29 Ocala H. S 

5 ...Duval H. S 

12 Melrose H. S 

19 Ocala H. S 

26 Duval H. S 

12 Orlando H. S 

1 Bradentown H. S 



20 


64 


9 


59 


16 


34 


19 


23 


8 


41 


L6 


18 


9 


30 


27 


43 


8 


26 


26 


35 


6 


26 



PAGE 49 










Leland Hiatt 

Center 
Frank Brumley 

Forward 
Cecil Robinson 

Center 



J. Rex Farrior, Coach 
Guy Matthews 

Guard 
Jack McDowall 

Guard 
Ralph Rhudy 

Guard 



Huber Watson 

Forward 
Donald Bishop 

Captain and Guard 
Andrew Ludwig 

Forward 



PAGE 50 



BOYS' BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 1921 

Jan. 8 Gainesville Alachua H. S. 17 G. H. S. 12 

Jan. 15 Alachua Alachua H. S. 16 G. H. S. 18 

Jan. 29 Orlando..... Orlando H. S. 11 G. H. S. 22 

Feb. 5 Jacksonville Duval H. S. 61 G. H. S. 3 

Feb. 12 Gainesville..... Melrose H. S. 8 G. H. S. 43 

Feb. 19 Gainesville High Springs 20 G. H. S. 43 

Feb. 26 Gainesville Duval H. S. 18 G. H. S. 12 

Early predictions concerning the future of the Boys' basketball team 
in the 1921 campaign were most pessimistic, because of the fact that there 
was only one letter man and a bunch of new players out of which the 
quintette had to be selected. Despite the size of the squad and the nov- 
elty of the game to the players every man displayed a willingness to 
work and a remarkable fighting spirit. These qualities coupled with the 
careful coaching of Coach Farrior soon assured the Purple backers that 
their predictions had been too hasty. The G. H. S. five developed into a 
fast machine, improving with each contest, until towards the end of the 
season, it exhibited real class, even comparing favorably with the best 
in the state. 

With every member of this year's quintette returning, the outlook for 
the 1922 session is exceedingly bright. 

—J. A. H. M. 

TRACK 

A new feature introduced this year into the athletic events at G. H. S. 
was that of the Interclass Track and Field Meet held several weeks pre- 
vious to the State High School Meet. All classes were well supported 
and the performance was most interesting, the Juniors winning handily. 

At the State Meet held April ninth and tenth Gainesville was repre- 
sented by a team composed of seven athletes. Vansickel and Brumley, 
however, proved the only point winners, capturing fifth place for the 
Purple and White. 

Track as a leading sport has yet to gain a firm footing in Gainesville 
High. 

—J. A. H. M. 



PAGE 51 













PAGE 52 



1921 BASEBALL SCHEDULE 

Newberry Newberry H. S. 2 G. H. S. 9 

Gainesville Newberry H. S. 5 G. H. S. 24 

Gainesville ......Univ. Prac. H. S. 10 G. H. S. 11 

Gainesville Univ. Prac. H. S. 3 G. H. S. 15 

Gainesville Chalmers M. A. 3 G. H. S. 14 

Gainesville Chalmers M. A. 2 G. H. S. 6 

Gainesville Chalmers M. A. 1 G. H. S. 11 

Gainesville Univ. Prac. H. S. 4 G. H. S. 6 

Ocala Ocala H. S. 2 G. H. S. 12 

Gainesville .Univ. Prac. H. S. 6 G. H. S. 7 

Gainesville Inverness H. S. 6 G. H. S. 9 

Jacksonville Chalmers M. A. 6 G. H. S. 11 

Jacksonville Duval H. S. 6 G. H. S. 4 

Gainesville Ocala H. S. 1 G. H. S. 12 

Gainesville Duval H. S. 5 G. H. S. 1 

Baseball in Gainesville High has at last received a boom. The coming 
of Coach Farrior into the Purple camp practically assured the success of 
this sport. Heretofore the National pastime has been sadly neglected, 
due to lack of proper support and the need of a coach. This year, how- 
ever, with the coach question remedied and the spirit of support com- 
menced, future seasons will undoubtedly see baseball one of the most 
popular sports at G. H. S. 

The record established by the 1921 team is highly creditable, especially 
so, considering that this is the first year baseball in Gainesville High has 
had any real organization. The Purple aggregation finished well up to- 
ward the lead in the run for State Championship, being defeated by Duval 
High, the leaders, only after two hotly contested battles. The season was 
a long one, comprising a list of seventeen games and extending through 
a period of eight weeks. 

Coach Farrior worked wonders with a squad of about twenty men, 
most of whom were inexperienced. He early put them into winning 
form. After the first few games the G. H. S. nine looked like a good bet. 
In Vansickel and Vrooman Coach Farrior boasted of one of the best bat- 
teries in the State. Vansickel's twisters fooled the best of them. Mur- 
phree (captain) at first, Welch on second, Davis short and Hollinrake at 
third comprised a neat fielding and hard-hitting infield. Watson in left, 
Brumley center and Pepper right was the line-up of the outfield. These 
three played a jam up defensive game, nor did they fail with the willow. 
In reserve were Baxley, Ludwig, Jordan and Dell, all good men. 

The work of Manager Crandall deserves note. His untiring efforts 
helped to make our schedule a success. 

—J. A. H. M. 



PAGE 53 





PAGE 54 



£! 



tejt * 



fe- 
rn 



^ 



| 




i. ■? '- 



% 



» 





r \(iK r.i; 



WEARERS OF THE "G" 








FOOTBALL 






Vrooman, D. 




Blitch 




Vrooman, P. 




Bishop, D. 




Eads 




Ludwig 




Parks 




Murphree 




Emerson 




Swearingen 




Vansickel 




Bishop, B. 




Davis 


BASKETBALL 


Brennan 




Girls 




Boys 




Chancey 




Bishop 




Baker 




Hiatt 




Tucker 




Brumley 




Pepper 




Ludwig 




Bullard 




Watson 




Jones 




Matthews 




Davis 




Robinson 




Creary 


TRACK 






Brumley 


Vansickel 
BASEBALL 


Gracy 




Vrooman, D. 




Watson 




Murphree 




Brumley 




Welch 




Pepper 




Davis 




Vansickel 




Ludwig 




Jordan 






Hollinrake 







PAGE 57 







"^lJF "Vive, apremde, Y s^hut-' 

SPANISH CLUB 
COLORS FLOWER 

Pink and Green Sweet Peas 

OFFICERS 

Lillian Long President 

W. P. Moseley Vice-President 

Aubrey Thompson.. Secretary and Treasurer 

members 

Inez Brooks Lillie Landers 

Irene Denham Rena Murrill 

Mary Hampton Kathryn Tucker 

Wilda Holland Andrew Zetrouer 



PAGE 58 




LAMBDA SIGMA SIGMA 
OFFICERS 

Catherine Davis President 

Lena Chancey Vice-President 

Lucile Boring Secretary and Treasurer 



Irene Colson 
Irene Denham 
Mabel Edwards 
Mary Lee Fowler 
Lillian Jones 



Mary Kincaid 

Mary Parker McCraw 

Alumni 
Elizabeth Hammargren 
Annie Lee Farmer 



PAGE 59 










PI ALPHA PI 

MOTTO 
Comfort and Conservation of Energy 
COLORS FLOWER 

Gold and White Desert Rose 

OFFICERS 

Frank Crom President 

John Gable Vice-President 

Deveaux Vrooman... Secretary and Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Julian Ballentine Allen Haile 

Barco Bishop Ralph Rhudy 

Willie Blitch Cecil Robinson 

Jennings Bobbitt Philip Vrooman 
Gardiner Welch 



PAGE 60 













DELTA SIGMA GAMMA 



MOTTO 
A good time, first, last and all the time 



COLORS 
Yellow and White 



FLOWER 

Chrysanthemum 



MEMBERS 

Cornelia Colson Gladys Kelley 

Dorothy Edwards Margaret Layton 

Sara Jenkins Lillian Long 
Agnes MeCormick 



PAGE 61 




eoMCf 



rWple and White Victorious in Championship Contes. 




PAGE 62 



THE COMET 

The G. H. S. "Comet," the first periodical our High School ever pub- 
lished, was started by the class of '20. The idea of such a paper origi- 
nated with the 1919 class, but it was through the efforts and work of the 
following class that this paper became a realization. 

The staff was elected by the student body and, with nothing to start 
on, the business managers went to work and in a very short time obtained 
enough advertisements to warrant the publication of the first issue. Af- 
ter the first issue, the success of the paper was assured, for the subscrip- 
tion list exceeded all expectations and the business houses of the city, 
giving their hearty support, backed the students in their undertaking. It 
was decided to make this paper a bi-weekly publication and, after the 
second issue, the paper was enlarged from four to six pages. The last 
number of the "Comet" was devoted to the Senior class, its activities and 
its accomplishments. At the close of the year $45 was left in the treasury 
for the succeeding staff to start on. 

The first year staff included : 

Alexina Haile .....Editor-in-Chief 

Jessie Mae Condon. Literary Editor 

John A. Murphree Athletic Editor 

JoeAnna Morris Business Manager 

Olin Cannon Assistant Business Manager 

Helen Smith Joke Editor 

Annie Lee Farmer Society Editor 

Beulah Strunk Exchange Editor 

Hope McClamroch Circulation Manager 

Elizabeth Hammargren Senior Class Reporter 

John Crandall Junior Class Reporter 

Hazel Cubberly Sophomore Class Reporter 

Ernest Lamons Sophomore Class Reporter 

Alice Willoughby Freshman Class Reporter 

Witsel Black .....Freshman Class Reporter 

This term, 1920-21, the work was taken up by the enthusiastic students 
and, though they did not enlarge the paper again, they improved it ; qual- 
ity not quantity being their motto. Following the precedent set by the 
preceding staff, towards the close of the year each class was given an 
issue. This encouraged competition among the classes and proved to be 
an excellent plan. 

It is hoped that in the coming years the work will be continued by 
zealous students who have watched the development of the paper from its 
beginning and who will strive to make it, not one of the best, but the best 
high school paper in the State of Florida. 

— H. M. 



PAGE 63 



□ iiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii inn iiiii[]iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii[iiiiiiiiiiiii[iiiiiiiiiiiiii]iiiiiiiiiiiii)iiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiii[]iiiiiiiiiiii(iiiiiiiiiiiii[D 

1 § 

(©atnesfotlle Jligf) gkfjool | 
Alumni gtestoctatton | 

g = 

»c ajiiiiiiMiiicsiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiMiiiicaiiiiiMiiii[E3iiiiiiiiiiiiEaiitiiMiMiJcaiiiiiiiiiiiiEaiiiiiiiiiii»caiiiiiiiiriiiEaiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiMiMic3iiiiiiiiiMicaiiiiiiiiiiiiEaiiMiiiiiiucaiiiiiii ^3 

COLORS FLOWER 

Purple and White Shasta Daisy 



OFFICERS 

Allan Moseley President 

Edna Earle Chesnut Vice-President 

Alexina Haile Secretary 

Clarence O'Neill Treasurer 

An Alumni Association! Who is there who has played and toiled 
through the years of school or college that does not appreciate the mean- 
ing of an Alumni Association? Who is there, having taken the very last 
step and on Graduation night, having proudly received his diploma from 
his Alma Mater, whose heart does not thrill at the thought of serving with 
love and honest endeavor his Mother School? This is the vital meaning 
of such an association and now G. H. S. can proudly throw her flag to 
the breezes and register one more step toward progress. 

The Gainesville High School Alumni Association was formed on May 
2nd, 1921. The personality of the present executive body is an exponent 
of the efficiency of old G. H. S. The high standard of this organization 
is best expressed in the preamble to the Constitution : "We, the former 
students of the Gainesville High School, grateful to our teachers, our 
parents, the educators and those who have made our education possible, 
in order to keep alive a sentiment of affection for our Alma Mater, unite 
the former students by a common tie of fellowship, foster the feelings of 



PAGE 64 



friendship and love toward each other, promote the welfare of the High 
School and encourage education, do ordain and establish this Constitution 
for our government." 

The membership is composed of three different classes, active, asso- 
ciate and honorary. Active members must have twelve units of work, 
associate members must have four units of work and honorary members 
are those elected to such a place by the Association. Honorary and asso- 
ciate members shall have all the rights and privileges except those of 
voting and holding office. 

From a social standpoint, from a beneficial standpoint, this Association 
should appeal to the boys and girls, the young men and young women, 
who have spent the greater part of their lives in school. There is noth- 
ing in the world which serves such a fine purpose as an endeavor to 
make oneself a potent agent in connection with humanity's advancement. 
To try to do something worth while — a service for another — is an inspira- 
tion concerning which every one may well be inwardly proud. All this, 
the fostering of high ideals, loyalty and service, tends toward the develop- 
ment of character and the idealization of noble manhood and noble 
womanhood. 

—A. H. 



PAGE G5 




JAMES M. EVERETT 

Custodian of Buildings and Grounds 

Mr. Everett is a landscape engineer and an expert custodian, having 
had fourteen years' experience with the United States Government, two 
years with the city schools of Savannah, Ga., and four years with the 
Gainesville schools. He also carried into execution the plans for the mag- 
nificent estate of Conrad Hubert at Mountain Lake, Fla. 

Due to the expert knowledge and skill of Mr. Everett, our school 
grounds have been transformed into a beautiful park, equaled by none in 
the State, our buildings are at all times kept in a comfortable and sanitary 
condition, and our athletic fields and courts make playing and recreation 
a delight. 



PAGE 66 













t\ Cetera 



PAGE 67 



TO A CRICKET 

Cheerful, chirping cricket, 
Wee fiddler of the night, 

Do you play for fairies dancing 
In the pale moonlight? 

Or are you serenading 
Some cricket maiden fair, 

Embowered high in the dewy grass 
And shyly listening there ? 

smallest of musicians. 

With hidden mystery fraught, 

You're nature's evening lullaby 
Stilling my tired heart. 



Excited One : There goes somebody running off with Mrs. Coffey's 
car! 

Wise Guy : Don't worry ; it'll only go a block and stop. 



IMMORTAL 
Eula Zetrouer: My works will be read after those of Milton, Burns 
and Dante are forgotten. 

Rutledge Emerson : Possibly, but not before then. 



Judge : You are sentenced to hang by the neck until dead. 
Sentenced : Judge, I believe you are stringing me. 



"I shouldn't have eaten that mission steak," 
Said the cannibal king with a frown, 

"For oft I've heard the old proverb : 
'You can't keep a good man down'." 



Mrs. Hall: Can you tell me anything at all about prussic acid? 
Guy Matthews: Yes, ma'am; it is a deadly poison. One drop on the 
end of your tongue would kill a dog. 



John Crandall : Yes, dad, I'm a big gun over at school. 
Mr. Crandall: Well, then, why don't I hear better reports? 



Miss Furgeson: What is an almanac? 
Lena Chancey : Oh, don't you know ? 



page m 



BUSY DAY AT G. H. S. 

8:30 A. M. — Prof, arrives in second-hand Ford. 

8:45 A.M. (or thereabouts) — Studes arrive. 

8:45 to 9:00. — Prof, leads bare-headed and devout Studes in prayer. 
Service concludes with the singing of "Onward Christian 
Soldiers." 

9:00 to 9:30. — Light refreshments of engraved doughnuts and Bevo a 
la Mode are served in the laboratory. 

9:30 to 10:45. — Student body and faculty enjoy baseball game; Janitors 
vs. Gardeners. 

10:45 to 11:00. — Few moments of recreation. 

11:00 to 12:20. — Several classes assemble, but disband on account of the 
heat. (Prof. Farrior faints from over-exertion and recuper- 
ates only after several quarts of moonshine have been 
forced (?) down his throat.) 

12 :20 to 1 :20 P. M.— Midday siesta. 

1 :20 P. M. — Arrival of students is greeted by reception committee — 

headed by Mrs. Cawthon. 
1 :20 to 2 :50. — Some enjoy naps while others cut classes. Senior class 

is excused to play on see-saws. 
2 :20 P. M. — Prof, drives off in his second-hand Ford while Studes are 

met bv their Packards, Rolls-Rovces and Pierce Arrows. 



She was sitting on the edge of the Woolworth Building caroling gaily 
to the passing sparrows, when — 

WHAT WOULD YOU DO IN HER PLACE? 
Read "How to Develop the Will." 

By Prof. James N. Anderson, Jr., B. V. D. 



A gent of imposing physique 

Picked a fight with a fellow quite mique, 

But the last had a frau 

Who joined in the rau, 
And the former's laid out just a wique. 



Deveaux: Do you think it would be foolish for me to marry a girl 
who was my intellectual inferior? 

Dot B. : More than foolish — impossible ! 



PAGE 69 



Miss Woodbery : Tell me what you know of the life of Kipling. 
Katherine Tilford : Well, Kipling was born in India when he was 
very young — 



Ferrell Wolfe : Mr. Vansickel, I do not like these pictures at all. 

Mr. Vansickel : Why not? 

Ferrell : They make me look too much like an ape. 

Mr. Vansickel : My dear sir, you should have thought of that before. 



Mr. D.: Do they give you any nick-name at school? 

Heyward D. : Yes, they call me "corns." 

Mr. D.: Why? 

Heyward: Because I'm always at the foot of the class. 



Thelma C. : I'll never go anywhere with you again as long as I live ! 
Talmadge: Why? 

Thelma C. : You asked Mrs. Jones how her husband was standing the 
heat and he has been dead for months. 



Bobbed hair to the right of us. 
Bobbed hair to the left of us. 
Bobbed hair in front of us, 

Seems to be the style ; 
Some look cute and wise, 
Others look small in size, 

And for some it spoils their profile. 



Teacher : And you say Thomas A. Edison invented the first talking 
machine. 

Jack : No, the first was made long before his time — out of a rib. 



Mr. Tucker (sternly) : Young man, I saw you put your arm around 
my daughter last night. 

John Simpson : I suppose you noticed how she struggled, too. 



Mary McMillan : What's good for cuts' 
Prof. : Regular attendance. 



"I think I can use your poem," said the editor as he proceeded to the 
fireplace. 



PAGE 70 



baby's bright sayings 

(The editor of this department wishes to say that he will distribute 
prizes ever so often for the Brightest Saying. These must be typewritten 
neatly by the little one itself, and handed in by he, she or it in person.) 

Fi>st Pi'ize 
Little John A., aged seventeen, returning from an outing in the park 
with his nurse, was asked if he enjoyed nature, and what he liked best. He 
thoughtfully parked his gum behind his left ear, and opening his wide blue 
eyes, said with great wonder — "Yes." 

Second Prize 
Little Guy Matthews, aged three, went to Ferrell Wolfe's birthday 
party. He had a nice time playing with the little folks and drinking the 
nice refreshing punch, but when time came to go, Guy didn't want to leave 
— the punch. But his nurse insisted. Between gulps and sobs he was 
heard to remark, "Ohell." 



Jennings : Do you think I can make her happy? 

Carlos: Well, she would always have something to laugh at. 



A pretty girl probably considers her face her fortune because it draws 
a lot of interest. 



Mable Edwards : Didn't you pass the train on your way to Ocala? 
Barco: Gee, but you must think I'm fast! 



In the spring a young man's fancy turns to what the girls have been 
thinking about all winter. 



Adam : And do you really care for me ? 

Eve: Yes, Adam, you're the only man I've really ever loved. 



1818— Fun 
1919— Sun 
1920— Run 
1921— Done 



PAGE 71 



Waning succeebeb toe tafee prtbe; 
fjalnng faileo toe fjope tfje follotoing 
Class map be more successful, 
-fttaff. 



PAGE 72 



I 

1 dk Xntroductng 
Our 
Hdvertieers ft 




^imrcWtW^rrtiffiMmtfW-tfrfSri ffittttvMSffiMMK&rSfiffi m iuTm ;fi"1 



PAGEJ73 



J. H, 

AUTHORIZED FORD DEALER 

GENUINE FORD PARTS FORD SERVICE 

Leading Makes of Tires and Tubes. Standard Ford Accessories. 

PHONE 4 



STAY RIGHT BY USING JUST-RITE SELF-RISING FLOUR AND 

BEAUTY PASTRY FLOUR, ALWAYS UNIFORM. FOR 

SALE BY ALL LEADING GROCERS 

BATEY-FLEMING GO,, DISTRIBUTORS 



J. G. 



Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 

FRESH MEATS 

Wienies a Specialty 
PHONE 25 GAINESVILLE, FLA. 



DIAMOND ICE COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 
PURE CRYSTAL ICE 

Cold Storage in Connection 

GAINESVILLE, - - FLORIDA 



PAGE 74 









" HUPMOBILE " 

THE ECONOMY CAR 




C. A. WOLF & GO. 

GAINESVILLE, - - - FLA. 



^ 



£? 



^ 



<~ 



THE BON TON 

REFRESHMENT PARLOR 






X 



JOHNSTON'S FANCY CANDIES 



GAINESVILLE 



"BILLIE'S" 
"We Are Your Everything" 

Phone 264 



FLORIDA 



PAGE 75 






€Jtt?JI)Wfta ^»f tonal itanJ 

<Samc0fcUU*,Mim!m. 



RESOURCES $2,500,000.00 



AUTO SUPPLIES AND ACCESSORIES 
HOOD AND AJAX TIRES AND TUBES 

GAINESVILLE AUTO SUPPLY CO, 

220 EAST MAIN ST. PHONE 183 



THE WHITE HOUSE 

One of Florida's Best Hotels 



JOS, J. SEYKORA 

EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL 

GAINESVILLE, FLA. PHONE 107 



PAGE 76 







WILL RAISE THE STANDARD 
OF ANY PRODUCT 



We are constantly striving, through a study of trade 

conditions, efficient methods and the application 

of modern machinery, to make our service 

more valuable to our customers 



Correspondence and Consultation are invited 

on all matters involving the use of type, 

engravings and printer's ink. 



"Printing up to a Standard — 
not down to a price". 



Pepper Printing Company 

TELEPHONE 136 GAINESVILLE, FLA. 






STAR GARAGE 

BUICK AGENCY 

J. R. FOWLER 

Full line of Tires, Tubes and Accessories. Complete stock Buick Parts. 
Fine Equipt Machine Shop. 

STORAGE A SPECIALTY 

WE NEVER CLOSE 



SPORTING GOODS 



BEST QUALITY BEST SERVICE 

We are Purple and White all the way through and are here to help you 
keep your high athletic standing. 

RAIRD HARDWARE GO. 

PHONE 7 



YOU WILL FIND 

W. R, SOPER 

STILL IN GROCERY AND FEED BUSINESS 

At Corner of Michigan and Alabama Avenues in North Gainesville. 

Drive out and get acquainted with your neighbor — 

you might like him. 



THE LUMBER MANUFACTURING GO. 

GAINESVILLE, FLA 
COMPLETE HOUSE BILLS OUR SPECIALTY 

PHONE FOURTEEN 



Lost — My patience in American 
Literature Class. Miss Ferguson. 

Wanted — A Vergil translation. 
Vergil Class. 

Wanted — Some high-life. Gladys 
Brown. 

Wanted — A new set of teeth, as 
my old ones are worn out chew- 
ing gum. Dorothy Bullard. 



Wanted to Know— Why so many 
Senior girls have lengthened 
their skirts. Of course we un- 
derstand why one did but we 
didn't know they all intended 
tying the knot so soon. Two 
Members of the Senior Class. 

Wanted — A Pacifier. Mr. Farrior. 
We wonder if Chesnuts will do. 

Wanted — Wives. Two members of 
the G. H. S. Faculty. 



PAGE 79 



OUR FONDEST HOPES 

ARE CENTERED AROUND 

THE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 

The graduates are supposed to have a vision of citizenship, 
expected to think clearer and to recognize your duty to society. 



You are 



We have labored long and untiring for a healthier sentiment among the 
people we love and we welcome the graduates to companionship in the 
community life. We have hopes that a larger civic life will be born as 
the annual graduates glide into the true responsibility. 

We are always glad to help. 



Ofic//i^>x^ 




W. S. DORSEY & GO. 

FANCY AND STAPLE 
GROCERIES 

Everything for your picnic lunch 



WILSON BROTHERS 

GAINESVILLE, FLA. 
Phone 640 221-225 W. Main St. 

SERVICE STATION 
TITAN BATTERIES 



RE 



a I |v k i" CHARGED 

Battery 



PAIRED 
SEALED 
BUILT 



PAGE 80 



GAINESVILLE AUTO CORPORATION 

GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 
REO SPEED WAGONS AND CARS 



([Oakland]) 

SALES, SERVICE 
ACCESSORIES AND SPARE PARTS 



KELLEY-MILLER MUSIC CO. 


Wanted — Husbands. Two Mem- 
bers of the G. H. S. Faculty. 


Dealers in 
EDISON PHONOGRAPHS AND 


Wanted — A teacher who will let us 
assign our own lessons and give 
our own exams. Senior Latin 
Class. 


HOBART M. CABLE PIANOS 


Wanted — A few less grumbles. 
Junior English Class. 


Musical Instruments and Sheet 


Wanted — A whole new Freshman 
Class. Professor. 


Music 


Wanted — Some anti-fat. Eleanor 
Barton. 


GAINESVILLE, FLA. 


Wanted — Something to make me 
laugh. Mrs. Cawthon. 



PAGE 81 






"WE WRITE IT RIGHT" 

MORRIS i^ANNON {COMPANY 
eans V»womplete v^overage 

INSURANCE AND BONDS 

PHONE 236 GAINESVILLE, FLA. 



When as few as three persons can look at the same color, 
■^ the same accident, or the same object, and each see it dif- 
ferently, it should deter us all from being too sure of our 
eyesight. 

Only a rigid examination will determine whether or not 
you need glasses. Consultation free. 

C. H. COLES & SON 




Strange 



SENIOR CLASS G. H. S. 

1921 
ACCEPT OUR HEARTIEST CONGRATULATIONS 



You have studied faithfully and the reward is rightfully yours. This institution 
has followed you closely, from the date that you first graced this world with your 
merry laugh and chubby face. Service was our watchword then, and now, years after, 
we still have the pleasure and honor to serve you. 

Entrust the cares of your future home and life with us — that we may continually 
serve you. 



Wee 



'T^^StS^ 



PAGE 82 



HIGH GRADE 


SPORTING GOODS 


MERCHANDISE 






BASEBALL 


AT POPULAR PRICES 


TENNIS 




FOOTBALL 


Headquarters for 


FISHING TACKLE, 


Dry Goods, Notions, and 


ETC. 


Gents' Furnishings 




PHIFER BROS. DEPT. STORE 


THE THOMAS CO, 


NEW YORK RACKET 


PHONE 22 







CHESNUT'S SHOE STORE 

ELECTRIC SHOE REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 
South Side Square 



GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 

Incorporated 1888 



CAPITAL 
SURPLUS 



$100,000.00 
150,000.00 



4% paid on savings 

accounts and certificates 

of deposit 



PAGE 83 









THE DURST IRON WORKS 


You Will Find 


MACHINISTS, BOILERMAKERS 
AND BLACKSMITHS 


A REGULAR TOWN 

■a 


Brass, Iron and Aluminum 


IN ONE HOUSE 


Castings 






in 


Repairs to All Kinds of Machinery 






THE COLLEGE INN 


GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 




SWEET WATER MILLS 


VANSICKEL'S STUDIO 


GAINESVILLE, FLA. 

Manufacturers of 

OLD STYLE WATER GROUND 






MEAL 


Will supply your wants in 


Wholesale Dealers in 


Photographs from a Post Card size 


HAY, GRAIN AND FEED, RICE, 
FLOUR, ETC. 


to Life size. 


Ask for our meal by name at your 




Grocer s — "It's the Best" 




Always Fresh, Wholesome and 
Sweet. Guaranteed to make 


QUICK KODAK ALL WORK 


"better" muffins. 


SERVICE GUARANTEED 



PAGE 84 












Pianos, Players and Automatic 

Instruments Tuned, Repaired 

and Refinished 



Special Attention to Pipe Organ 
Tuning and Rebuilding 



HENRY WOLF 

219 East Main St., South 
GAINESVILLE, FLA. 



Pianos, Phonographs, Player Rolls 

Sheet Music, String Instruments 

Everything in Music 



BICYCLES 



HIGH CLASS MODELS 



Accessories — Repairs 



A. H. DORAN 

218 East Main, So. 
GAINESVILLE, FLA. 



DO YOUR BANKING BUSINESS WITH 

THE PHIFER STATE BANK 

A STRONG STATE BANK UNDER STATE SUPERVISION 

GAINESVILLE. FLA. 



BROWN BROS. CO. 

HICKORY STOVE WOOD 

AT REDUCED PRICES 

PHONE 135 



PAGE 85 



COMMENCEMENT GIFTS 

We're alive with them! 



"A thing of beauty is a joy 


GAINESVILLE PLANING & 


forever" 
Beautiful, as well as everlasting, 


COFFIN CO. 


are the following gift suggestions : 




Diamond Rings, Pendants, Pins, 
Brooches, Watch Bracelets, Gents' 


LUMBER 


Watches, C a m e o Pendants, 
Brooches and Pins ; Ivory Toilet 


SHINGLES 


Sets, Umbrellas, Fountain Pens, 


LATH 


Eversharp Pencils, Photo Frames, 




Sterling Silver Novelties, etc. 




"Gifts That Last" 


The Best of Their Kind 


L, C. SMITH 


SERVICE OUR MOTTO 


S. SIDE SQUARE 






BOWERS SHOE STORE 


LET ME BE YOUR 


New Baird Bldg. 


TAILOR 






MAXINE SHOES 


OTTO F. STOCK 


for Women 
WHITE HOUSE SHOES 




for Men 


ALTERATION, CLEANING 
AND REPAIRING 


BUSTER BROWNS 
for Children 




Last AA to D 



PAGE- 86 






J. W. McCOLLUM & GO. 

DRUGGISTS 

THE REXALL STORE 

Toilet Articles, Perfumes, Cigars and Tobacco 
Agents Liggett's and Norris' Candies 

Opera House Block, Corner East Main and Union Streets 
PHONE 141 



JLyric TJheater 

Incorporated 

HOME OF FEATURE PICTURES 

S. L. CARTER 
Managing Director 



BICYCLES AND SPORTING GOODS 

B. LI LI EN BLUM 



PAGE '87 







The Coldest Cold Drinks 

and 

The Best lee Cream in Town 



COMMENCEMENT 



When a young man graduates he emerges from the chrysalis of boy- 
hood into a new life. 

It's an important step — an occasion that calls for the best in looks — 
the finest in clothes. 

We have them at $22.50 to $40.00. 

ALSO 
NEW HATS SHIRTS NECKWEAR 

Truly we have earned a diploma for the effort we are putting forth in 
getting you ready for yours. 



NUFF SED 

THE r 



BURNETT I n L CLOTHIER 



PAGE M 



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